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SNC-Lavalin delays jury decision in corruption trial until June 28

Darpan News Desk The Canadian Press, 07 Jun, 2019

    SNC-Lavalin Group Inc. is pushing back its decision on whether to opt for a trial by jury or by judge alone in a corruption case that has tripped up the engineering giant and ensnared it in a political controversy for months.

    "I need more time to make the choice. It has to be decided by several people in the company," defence lawyer Francois Fontaine told the Court of Quebec on Friday.

    "Because it's an important decision," he told reporters after the morning hearing. "It's a big company. It's necessary to take the time to analyze it carefully."

    Last week a Quebec judge ruled there is enough evidence to send SNC-Lavalin to trial over charges of fraud and corruption, prompting a further tumble in the beleaguered firm's share price.

    The company has previously pleaded not guilty to the criminal charges. SNC-Lavalin is due back in court June 28. The Montreal-based firm is accused of paying $47.7 million in bribes to public officials in Libya between 2001 and 2011. SNC-Lavalin, its construction division and a subsidiary also face one charge each of fraud and corruption for allegedly defrauding various Libyan organizations of $129.8 million.

    The court hearing in Montreal on Friday was the latest step in criminal proceedings that began last fall after SNC-Lavalin failed to secure a deferred prosecution agreement, a kind of plea deal that would have seen the firm agree to pay a fine rather than face prosecution.

    Since early February, SNC-Lavalin has been at the centre of a political controversy following accusations from former attorney general Jody Wilson-Raybould that top government officials pressured her to overrule federal prosecutors and negotiate a deferred prosecution agreement with the company.

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