Friday, November 15, 2019
ADVT 
National

Alberta Alters Rules On Oil Production Limits To Spur More Conventional Drilling

Darpan News Desk The Canadian Press, 08 Nov, 2019
  • Alberta Alters Rules On Oil Production Limits To Spur More Conventional Drilling

EDMONTON - Alberta's energy minister says the government is adjusting its rules on oil production limits to give producers incentive to drill more conventional wells.

 

Sonya Savage says, starting immediately, any oil produced from a new well will not be subject to the rules.

 

Savage says the government expects the change will spur producers to drill hundreds of new wells and that each well will create about 145 jobs.

 

Due to pipeline bottlenecks, the former NDP government limited the amount companies could produce to prevent a surplus such as the one last year that sharply reduced prices for Alberta oil.

 

Production from new wells is expected to flow next year and into 2021.

 

Savage says the expectation is more pipeline capacity and expanded crude-by-rail will handle increased production so as not to have an impact on prices.

 

MORE National ARTICLES

Kevin O'Leary Legal Challenge Of Leadership Finance Rules Set For April

Kevin O'Leary Legal Challenge Of Leadership Finance Rules Set For April

Celebrity businessman and former Conservative leadership contender Kevin O'Leary has an April court date to challenge the constitutionality of campaign finance law.

Kevin O'Leary Legal Challenge Of Leadership Finance Rules Set For April

Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister Says Canada Can Unite On Climate Action If Partisan Politics Set Aside

Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister Says Canada Can Unite On Climate Action If Partisan Politics Set Aside

Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister says the fight against climate change can unite this country even as it currently is fuelling talk of Alberta separation.

Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister Says Canada Can Unite On Climate Action If Partisan Politics Set Aside

Bones Found Almost 50 Years Ago Recognized As B.C.'s First Dinosaur Species

Bones Found Almost 50 Years Ago Recognized As B.C.'s First Dinosaur Species

VICTORIA - A geologist's discovery of a mysterious claw in rocks along a rail line in British Columbia's northern wilderness almost 50 years ago has led to the recognition of the first dinosaur species unique to the province.

 

 

Bones Found Almost 50 Years Ago Recognized As B.C.'s First Dinosaur Species

B.C. Should Demand Miners Pay Cleanup Costs Up Front: Indigenous Study

B.C. Should Demand Miners Pay Cleanup Costs Up Front: Indigenous Study

VANCOUVER - A report is urging British Columbia to get better financial guarantees that mining companies will pay for the mess they make.

 

 

B.C. Should Demand Miners Pay Cleanup Costs Up Front: Indigenous Study

B.C. Site Testing Over 700 Samples Of Kombucha For Alcohol Levels

B.C. Site Testing Over 700 Samples Of Kombucha For Alcohol Levels

The centre is working with the BC Institute of Technology, which is testing the last of about 760 samples of the beverage.

B.C. Site Testing Over 700 Samples Of Kombucha For Alcohol Levels

Wildlife Expert Identifies Rogue Goose Likely Responsible For Attacking Woman

Wildlife Expert Identifies Rogue Goose Likely Responsible For Attacking Woman

The woman in charge of a rehabilitation centre for wild animals in Nova Scotia says she has identified the aggressive goose that was likely responsible for an unprovoked attack on an 87-year-old Halifax-area woman.

Wildlife Expert Identifies Rogue Goose Likely Responsible For Attacking Woman

PrevNext