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How to embrace Diwali this year

Mrinalini Sundar Darpan, 14 Nov, 2020
  • How to embrace Diwali this year

How to embrace Diwali this year The festival of lights aka Diwali aka one of the most celebrated festivals in India is fast approaching. But 2020 has put a full stop on all the celebrations, and so we have to come up with new ways to enjoy the festivities.

If one was to go by the mythological texts then Diwali is all about good taking over the bad, and with that hope we will be embracing the festivities this year, albeit a little differently. Here are a few steps I hope to follow for the upcoming Diwali, and enjoy this time with my family. Read on...

Go virtual: Zoom has become the one-point-solution to all communication issues. But this year Zoom will also be useful for all sorts of virtual events. So sit back, relax, and watch some family friendly shows such as Virtual Diwali, Family Day, Friends Of India Diwali Celebrations, Diwali London, and the mega Times Square events is also said to have an online version of the event. Several other events will also be streamed live on Facebook, etc so the day can look quite busy. Do make a list of these shows and don’t miss out the fun on the big day.

Self-care is primary: This year has been very difficult for everyone courtesy COVID-9.The need of the hour is for everyone to indulge in self-care. Mental health is of utmost importance to everyone at this point of time, anything to relieve stress or anxiety is a gift that you can present yourself this Diwali. A self-care package from any of the top brands that includes lotions, bath products, creams, hair creams and products can be very useful. Another idea is to draw yourself a relaxing bath, light the candles, and wish you a Happy Diwali.

Clean up: This year is all about sanitizing and cleaning up. But Diwali is also that time of the year when the house gets a makeover and major cleanup and face lift. Bring the sanitizers in, clean the house, get rid of what you don’t need, decorate the space, and give the house a new feel and look. While at it, make sure you also indulge in organising and categorizing the house. This way you are not just bringing in positive vibes to your house and your mind alike.

Indulge in all sorts of sweets: Diwali is a time when you can indulge in sweets and nobody will judge you for those extra holiday kilos. Gobble up as many rasgoolas, gulab jamuns, and kaju katlis as you want, for this is Diwali. Either get your mithai ke dabbe from a store, or experiment this year by making these sweets at home. Our favourite however are the moti choor ke laddo that can never be too many of them. We also plan to take it a step further and try making some delicacies such as shahi tukda and modak. Make this Diwali extra special and pack the sweets for your loved ones in a fancy box. Now you and your family have truly embraced Diwali.

Crackerless festivities: For the past several years, the use of crackers has gradually reduced. With people getting aware about child labour and the chemical and environmental harm that the crackers do has been the major cause for the reduction in crackers. But this year, the use of crackers is going to be in its minimum. So what is the alternative? Well, that's why we are here to help. Try procuring glow sticks, colourful balloon firecrackers which are harmless and can be a tad noisy for your liking. You can also get paper popper which are easy to make and is fun for kids. If the kids want something noisier, then get them a vuvuzela which makes a loud sound and is a good alternative for the chemical bombs. These crackers are harmless and there is no fear of your child incurring injuries or a burn.

Buy local: This year the best way to embrace any festival for that matter is by supporting local businesses. From shopping your lehenga, kurta, or children's clothes, make sure you buy them from the Indian handicraft store that hardly sees any customer these days. For all the return gifts that you generally give you’re closed one, head over to that artist who makes handmade goodies. If you are feeling lazy to make mithai at home, that's alright, too. Support the local halwai or the homemaker who bakes yummy goodies.

This year is all about giving back to the community and supporting people from across the globe to survive. Buying local can be a great gesture and can help business stay afloat. While you can be bummed about this year and its festivities going downhill, we believe it is all about living in the moment and embracing everything that comes our way.

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