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Parenting

Life Skills,Sports & Youth

By Mehakpreet Dhaliwal, 01 Dec, 2020
  • Life Skills,Sports & Youth

Here are a few reasons why you should sign your child up for a sport or activity today!

 

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You’ve probably heard that exercise is good for our minds and bodies; it’s a well-known fact in our world today. However, exercise, especially at a young age, has more benefits than just helping you stay in shape. Participation in sports and activities positively impacts the lives of young children by helping them develop important life skills, character traits, and values. Whether team-based or individual, sports and other activities help with the physical, social, mental, and emotional development and well-being of a child’s health. Experts say that children should engage in at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity every day. Here are a few reasons why you should sign your child up for a sport or activity today!

 

Builds their self-confidence and self-esteem


Seeing their hard-work pay off, and accomplishing their goals helps boost the self-confidence and esteem of children. Support from coaches, fellow teammates,
and parents plays an important role in helping children feel proud of themselves. This also teaches them that they can achieve any goal in life, on and off the field, if they set their mind to it.


Learning discipline


Following specific game rules and regulations, and obeying the directions of coaches, referees and other older individuals, even if they may not agree with them, teaches children discipline and respect for those in charge. Children also acquire knowledge of how to accept constructive criticism and use it to aid them in their personal growth and development.


Developing patience and persistence


By setting goals for themselves and working hard to achieve them, children learn the importance of patience and build persistence. They understand the importance of dedication and focus, and realize that hard work always pays off. The same principles apply in real life as well - when trying to accomplish any goal, patience and persistence play key roles in determining success.

Develops teamwork skills and new friendships


Being on a sports team helps children develop social skills, and provides them with the opportunity to create new friendships. Engaging in team sports teaches them how to cooperate and be selfless when working together to achieve a common goal. Most importantly, when children play together, win together, and lose together, it gives them a sense of belonging and closeness that’s difficult to find in other social environments, such as school.


Learning how to lose


Learning how to accept and deal with defeat is an important life lesson, and in most competitive sports, there is always a winner and a loser. Losing teaches children how to never give up, and become resilient by learning from your mistakes rather than allowing them to bring you down.

Lastly, parents play a crucial role in creating a positive environment for their children by teaching them the importance of focusing on having fun and trying their best, rather than winning or losing. Instead of criticizing their mistakes, guide them on how to effectively learn from them. Reassuring your child and providing them emotional support can go a long way. Most importantly, don’t forget to tell them to have fun and enjoy themselves while following their passions and accomplishing their goals - on and off the field!

 

Images:istockphoto

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